Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
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Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

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Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Our Mission

Our continued goal is to provide the highest quality pet health care to our clients and patients in a professional, compassionate, comfortable environment.


Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Our Hospital

The Tantallon Veterinary Hospital is a full service small animal hospital established in 2006. We are a devoted team made up of 7 veterinarians, 9 technicians and 3 receptionists.


Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Services

Promoting optimal health, prevention of disease, and relief of animal suffering are our main concerns. Our clients and patients are first and foremost and we will strive to develop life long relationships with them. We will treat each client and patient with personal and individualized treatment and care.


A complete list of our services

Medicine and Diagnostics

Dogs and cats age faster than people so significant changes in your pets health can happen in a short time.

Because of this it is important to have physical examinations performed on your pet once a year. Senior pets, or pets with health concerns, may need to have a check up more frequently.

These annual examinations allow us to diagnose disease and conditions early, to treat them more easily, or prevent disease entirely. This is done through a thorough history review and a “hands on” examination. If warranted, any further lab work or diagnostic testing will be discussed with you at that time. We will work with you to create a health plan for your pet.

If your pet is ill or showing any changes in health that are not typical, please call the hospital to book an appointment. With six veterinarians we can often accommodate you very quickly. We are a modern Hospital with an in house laboratory, ultrasound and digital x-ray so can perform many diagnostic procedures on site. We can often give you immediate answers and start treating your pet quickly.

We understand the close relationship between pets and their owners. We strive to examine, diagnose then implement a treatment plan as quickly as possible with minimal wait times. This ensures your pet is home as quickly as possible.
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Surgery

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
We, at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital, know it can be scary when your pet is undergoing a surgical procedure.

Whether it be a routine, elective procedure like a neuter or spay, or a more extensive type of surgery such as an exploratory laporotomy or emergency surgery, we are here to answer any questions you may have.

What happens when my pet is having surgery?

Generally, your pet has a full examination upon arrival at the hospital. A small amount of blood is drawn by one of our veterinarians or technicians. The blood is analyzed to check for a variety of internal health parameters. This allows us to carefully choose which anesthetics and post operative pain medications are the safest for your pet. It also tells us if there is any trouble or ill health which may not be apparent on physical examination. When the blood test results are normal, we keep that information in our files. It can be accessed over the years to tell us what is normal for your pet and compare it to future test results.

Next, your pet will be given a small injection of a sedative. This accomplishes many things. It calms and relaxes a possibly nervous patient, it allows a reduction on the amount of general anesthetics that will be used for the procedure itself and eases the patient in and out of General Anesthetic gradually and sleepily.

Then, just prior to the surgery, an intravenous catheter is placed in your pet’s leg. This allows delivery of a general anesthetic injection as well as fluids during surgery. After the anesthetic injection is given, your pet is no longer awake or feeling anything. A tube is placed through the mouth into the trachea or ‘windpipe’. The tube is connected to an anesthetic machine that distributes oxygen and anesthetic into your pet for the entire surgical procedure. Your pet is monitored using oxygen, heart rate, and blood pressure monitors. A technician provides all nursing care including temperature regulation, anesthetic, and fluid monitoring.

Your pet is shaved in our treatment area and then moved to our surgery suite for his or her surgery. Our surgery suite is equipped with heated surgery tables, state of the art anesthetic machines, monitoring devices and lighting equipment. Once the procedure is performed your pet wakes up with pain control injections in his/her system on a warming recovery system called a Bair Hugger. with a veterinary technician by your pets side providing all nursing needs.

Once your pet is awake and can stand, dogs will be taken outside for bodily needs, and cats will be offered a litter box.

Your pet's safety and comfort are of the utmost importance to us so attention to every detail is made. If you have any special requests, please let us know and we will do our best to accommodate you.

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Nutrition

Veterinary nutrition is a science where something new is learned every day.

We, at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital, continue to educate ourselves on advancements in nutrition by attending annual seminars and conferences, food manufacturing plant tours and in-house seminars with veterinary nutritionist presentations and consultations.

Our veterinarians at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital will help you choose a diet for your pet based on multiple health parameters, including the following:

- Age
- Body condition
- Breed
- Lifestyle
- Heath status or presence of conditions such as:
   • Skin conditions and/or skin infections
   • Allergies
   • Heart murmurs or heart conditions
   • Kidney disease
   • Liver disease
   • Chronic or intermittent diarrhea or vomiting
   • Dietary intolerance and hypersensitivities
   • Inflammatory bowel disease
   • Arthritis or joint disease
   • Endocrine disease such as diabetes,
hypothyroidism (dogs), hyperthyroidism (cats)
   • Feline lower urinary tract disease
   • Bladder stone prevention
   • Treatment and prevention of dental disease
   • Or any combination of the above conditions

Dental Care



Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

It is estimated that 90% of dogs and cats over the age of 2 have some form of dental disease, and of that 90%, 50% require immediate attention.

Dental disease starts when plaque forms on the teeth. If not removed this develops into dental calculus commonly known as tartar. This in turn changes the pH of the mouth allowing bacteria to survive under the gum line. The by-products of these bacteria ‘eat away’ at the gums and tooth support structures, including the ligaments and bone.

So why do we care about dental disease in our pets?

If left untreated, dental disease causes:
   • Chronic pain. Most animals show few obvious signs of pain, yet suffer from discomfort, toothaches and chronic oral pain.
   • Localized infections. Dental disease can cause tooth root abscesses and inflamed, swollen gums.
   • Internal organ disease. Bacteria from the mouth can get into the bloodstream and become widely distributed throughout the body; in particular the heart, kidneys, lungs and joints.

What can I do

Start with having your pet examined to stage the dental disease. Then, our veterinarians will decide on an appropriate treatment plan for the individual pet.

Home dental care

Regular home care should be started at approximately 6 months of age. Depending on the size of your pet, an infant, child or adult soft toothbrush can be used. Use toothpaste formulated for pets that is safe to swallow. We carry a variety of flavors at the hospital. Try to make brushing an enjoyable experience and praise your pet for letting you brush his or her teeth.

Veterinary Dental Treatments
This includes a comprehensive oral examination and assessment of each tooth. Teeth will be treated with a full cleaning of the crown of each tooth as well as a thorough cleaning below the gum line, all done with an ultrasonic scaler. Next, a polish is applied to remove microscopic scratches and make the surface more resistant to plaque build up. If required oral surgery will be performed and decayed teeth will be surgically extracted thus removing the pain and source of infection. Dental x-rays are often performed to view the crown, tooth roots and supporting structures. Radiographs are an important part of dental assessments because they help identify the severity of periodontal disease and the health of each individual tooth, thus aiding in the treatment plan.

General anesthetic is required. It is not possible to do a thorough and proper dental exam and treatment while the patient is awake. It is not possible to examine all teeth surfaces, or examine below the gum line or take x-rays. Ultrasonic scalers cannot be used in an awake animal as they produce sound, vibrations and eject water that ‘tickle’ the gingiva. Any attempts of a dental cleaning by non-veterinary individuals with improper choice of instruments will lead to scarring and micro-pitting of the enamel, thus damaging the tooth. This will cause plaque and tartar development to occur more rapidly and progress to further dental disease.

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your pet’s dental health status please call us to book an appointment with one of our veterinarians.

Preanesthetic Blood Testing

Blood work before any surgical procedure is always a good idea, as it gives us a better overall picture of your pet’s health and well-being.

A small amount of blood is drawn by one of our veterinarians or technicians. The blood is analyzed to check for a variety of internal health parameters. This allows us to carefully choose which anesthetics and postoperative pain medications are the safest for your pet. It also tells us if there is any trouble or ill health, which may not be apparent on physical examination. If there are abnormalities in any of the parameters of the blood work we can either post pone the procedure and retest your pet at a later time, or suggest further diagnostics to get to the underlying disease process, or change the drug protocol and proceed with the surgery. This all equates to safe and uneventful anesthetic.

When the blood test results are normal, we keep that information in our files. It can be accessed over the years to tell us what is normal for your pet and compare it to future test results.

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital is fully equipped with in house blood services so all samples are run on site.

Ultrasounds - NEW!

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital is now offering abdominal ultrasounds!!!

Book your clients quickly and easily with our 7-day a week service.
- All ultrasounds are submitted for interpretation by a board certified radiologist.
- Ultrasounds can be performed 7 days a week from 8am-8pm.
- Attached is a referral form, which can be emailed or faxed when complete.
- Patients will be dropped off for a period of approximately three hours and then the results submitted for interpretation.
- Reports from the radiologist will be forwarded to the referring clinic for discussion with the client when received. This is usually within a 24 hour time frame.

Ultrasound Referral Form (PDF)

Boarding Facility

Our cat boarding facility is kept on the top floor where there is peace and quiet. The climate-controlled area has large cages and some kitty condos that have 2 levels in them with perches to sit on. Cats are rotated one at a time to have a walk around the room, perch in the windowsills, play with toys and use the scratching post.

Our boarding facility is kept clean and pets are well cared for by our attentive staff. If any concerns arise there are veterinarians on site to examine and monitor the animals. This equates to a comfortable, safe, enjoyable stay.

Cat Boarding includes:
- All dishes
- Litter box and Litter
- Litter box cleaned twice a day
- Windows to look outside
- Toys
- Scratching post
- Disinfecting and cleaning of kennels performed daily

All cats must be up to date on core vaccines (Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies). Cats over 8 months of age must be spayed or neutered. We appreciate your understanding.

Pets owners can email our staff to get updates on their pets at tantallonvet@eastlink.ca. This email is checked daily to ensure a prompt reply to any inquiries and/or requests.

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

DOG HEALTH

   - Spaying and neutering

Canine Spay or Ovariohysterectomy
Canine Spay or Ovariohysterectomy is the surgical removal of a female dog’s ovaries and uterus. It is generally performed after 6 months of age. A spay is a day surgery. Your pet should have no food after midnight the day before surgery but water is fine. Please drop off in the morning between 7:30am- 8:30am (this time is flexible) and pick up between 6-8pm the same day. Your pet will go home with pain control medication and discharge instructions, which the staff will review at the time of pick up.

What are the Benefits of Spaying Your Dog?
- The prevention of unwanted litters and risks associated with pregnancy such as Caesarian Sections
- The prevention of uterine, ovarian, and mammary gland (breast) cancers
- The prevention of pyometra, a life threatening infection in the uterus
- The prevention of annoying heat cycles

Canine neuter or Orchidectomy
Canine neuter or Orchidectomy is the surgical removal of the male dog’s testicles. It is generally performed at 6 months of age, but can done later in life. A neuter is a day surgery. Please drop him off in the morning between 730am-830am (this time is flexible) and pick up is between 6pm-8pm the same day. Your pet will go home with pain medication and discharge instructions, which the staff will review at the time of pick up. (Click on discharge instructions)

What are the Benefits of Neutering Your Dog?
- Aids in the prevention of unwanted litters - The prevention of testicular diseases such as testicular cancers, testicular tension, etc.
- The reduction of prostatic diseases and the reduction of testosterone induced diseases such as prostate infections, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostate tumors, perianal tumors, and perianal hernias.
- The prevention or reduction of testosterone mediated behavioral problems, such as marking territory, roaming, guarding, and aggression towards other dogs (especially males) and people.

   - Vaccinations

Keeping your pet vaccinated is an important part of preventative health care. Vaccines are an easy and effective way of protecting your pet from serious illness. Every pet even if they are kept indoors should be vaccinated. Here at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital we follow modern vaccination protocols and can tailor your pet’s vaccine requirements based on lifestyle and exposure risks.

Vaccines are broken down into “core” vaccines which are recommended for all puppies and kittens regardless of lifestyle and “non-core” vaccines which are tailored to your pet. We would be happy to discuss your individual needs for your pet.

Core vaccines for dogs are Distemper, Adenovirus, Para-influenza and Parvovirus, and Rabies. Non-core vaccines are, Bordetella, Lyme and Leptosporosis.

Core vaccines for cats are Feline Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies (if going outside). Non-core vaccines are Feline Leukemia Virus

How many vaccines does my pet need?
Kittens and puppies typically start with a series of three vaccines spaced one month apart in order to develop a proper immunity to the diseases we are vaccinating them for. These vaccines are then boostered one year after the last vaccine date, and then every 1 to 3 years depending on the vaccine.

Annual Physical Exams
A physical examination is performed with all vaccination appointments; if your pet is not currently due for vaccines we still recommend an annual check up exam. An annual exam and thorough history is one of the most important tools in our diagnostic toolbox. Even if your pet is healthy a physical exam will allow us to evaluate them for subtle changes and early detection is the key to successful outcomes and prolongs the length and quality of life for our pets.

Read more about Canine Vaccinations here.

   - Parasite Control

We share our homes, our furniture sometimes even our beds with our furry friends. Our pets can share some of their parasites with us. Like many things young children are considered most at risk but the elderly or any one with a compromised immune system or pets visiting or working in places with children or immune compromised people should be aware of the zoonotic risk of parasites. Parasite eggs are microscopic and not visible to the human eye, and many can be quite hardy and can survive in the environment for some time before infecting our pets or us. We at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital will help you decide which parasite control program is most appropriate for your pet based on your dogs lifestyle.

External parasites
The most commonly encountered external parasites are Fleas and Ticks. All dogs that go outside are at risk of getting fleas and ticks and we can see an increase in the spring and fall. Fleas can make your dog itchy and uncomfortable but can also cause flea allergy dermatitis, anemia and can transmit tapeworm. Ticks are blood feeders that have received a lot of attention on the news lately with the spread of Lyme disease and other organisms spread by these biting parasites. We used to think ticks were a seasonal problem but with warmer temperatures and continued spread in the range of this organism we can see ticks all year long. Ticks feed when the air temperature is 4° C or warmer. Even if there is snow on the ground they can climb onto a blade of grass and wait for an animal to walk by. In the early spring there can be a bloom of the juvenile stages sometimes referred to as seed ticks, which are hardly bigger, then the end of a pencil. These are so small that it would be difficult to see them through even the short fur of our pets. Intestinal parasites
Intestinal worms in dogs come in 4 forms: Roundworm, Hookworm, Whipworm,and Tapeworm.

They are contracted by one of the following modes of transmission:
- The passage from a pregnant or nursing mother to her puppies
- The ingestion of feces
- The ingestion of raw meat or animal remains in the environment
- The ingestion of infected soil
- The ingestion of unwashed/uncooked infected vegetables
- Intestinal worms can cause no symptoms or can cause weight loss, malnourishment, intestinal discomfort, intestinal blockage, bloody diarrhea, and/ or anemia.

Dogs are also at risk for contracting other internal parasites such as Coccidia, Giardia, Heartworm, Lungworm and Raccoon Roundworm. There are a number of new treatments options available to treat and prevent these parasites through topical, or oral administration. These are prescriptions that are designed to be safer and more effective than ‘over the counter’ type products.

   - Parasite Control

We share our homes, our furniture sometimes even our beds with our furry friends. Our pets can share some of their parasites with us. Like many things young children are considered most at risk but the elderly or any one with a compromised immune system or pets visiting or working in places with children or immune compromised people should be aware of the zoonotic risk of parasites. Parasite eggs are microscopic and not visible to the human eye, and many can be quite hardy and can survive in the environment for some time before infecting our pets or us. We at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital will help you decide which parasite control program is most appropriate for your pet based on your dogs lifestyle.

External parasites
The most commonly encountered external parasites are Fleas and Ticks. All dogs that go outside are at risk of getting fleas and ticks and we can see an increase in the spring and fall. Fleas can make your dog itchy and uncomfortable but can also cause flea allergy dermatitis, anemia and can transmit tapeworm. Ticks are blood feeders that have received a lot of attention on the news lately with the spread of Lyme disease and other organisms spread by these biting parasites. We used to think ticks were a seasonal problem but with warmer temperatures and continued spread in the range of this organism we can see ticks all year long. Ticks feed when the air temperature is 4° C or warmer. Even if there is snow on the ground they can climb onto a blade of grass and wait for an animal to walk by. In the early spring there can be a bloom of the juvenile stages sometimes referred to as seed ticks, which are hardly bigger, then the end of a pencil. These are so small that it would be difficult to see them through even the short fur of our pets. Intestinal parasites
Intestinal worms in dogs come in 4 forms: Roundworm, Hookworm, Whipworm,and Tapeworm.

They are contracted by one of the following modes of transmission:
- The passage from a pregnant or nursing mother to her puppies
- The ingestion of feces
- The ingestion of raw meat or animal remains in the environment
- The ingestion of infected soil
- The ingestion of unwashed/uncooked infected vegetables
- Intestinal worms can cause no symptoms or can cause weight loss, malnourishment, intestinal discomfort, intestinal blockage, bloody diarrhea, and/ or anemia.

Dogs are also at risk for contracting other internal parasites such as Coccidia, Giardia, Heartworm, Lungworm and Raccoon Roundworm. There are a number of new treatments options available to treat and prevent these parasites through topical, or oral administration. These are prescriptions that are designed to be safer and more effective than ‘over the counter’ type products.

   - Basic Training

Whatever the method you choose to train your puppy, the first step is to be absolutely sure that your puppy understands what is expected. It is important to consistently praise your puppy for doing the right thing. Positive reinforcement is a much more powerful tool than punishment. Many puppies become afraid of their owners or sometimes try to fight back aggressively because they don’t understand why they are being punished. Punishment after the fact does not work.

Walking with a collar and leash. Get your puppy used to a collar first and then a leash. These are essential to protect the dog throughout its life. Start with a narrow, soft nylon collar and lightweight leash. When you are outside, try to walk along with your puppy, keeping the leash loose so that he does not get used to walking while pulling.

Practice keeping your puppy’s attention and eye contact. One of the biggest problems in training a dog is getting their attention so that he will listen to you. Getting your puppy to look at you and pay attention will make teaching any kind of command much more successful. Encourage your puppy to make eye contact with you by saying the name and holding a treat close to your face when your puppy looks at you while praising for maintaining eye contact. Now that he’s looking at you, he’s ready to listen to a command.

Sit. This is the easiest command to start training. Take a food tidbit and hold it in front of your puppy’s nose in a closed fist. Pass your fist toward the back of your puppy’s head as you say “sit”. As the head goes up and back to follow the treat, the puppy will usually automatically sit. Repeat this exercise regularly until your pet learns to sit as soon as the command is issued.

Stay. Stay is nothing more than a long sit. To teach your puppy to stay, stand in front of them and ask to sit. When the sit happens, praise, but don’t give a treat. Instead, say “stay” as you step back and give an open hand signal. Then, immediately, give a treat. Repeat the process, increasing distance as you step back from your puppy. Go only one step at a time.

Down. After your puppy has mastered “stay”, now it is time for the “down” command. Start by giving the “stay” command. Then as you say “down”, take a food treat in your fist, place it at your puppy’s nose and pass it down to the floor. Your puppy will follow the treat and lie down. After your puppy consistently goes into the “down” position, you can teach them to stay in this position just as for the sit position.

Come. When your puppy will sit or lie down and stay while you take ten steps away, it is time to begin the “come” command. Give your puppy the “sit” and “stay” command. Take five steps back, whistle, say your dog’s name and “come” in an excited tone of voice. You may want to open your arms or make some other welcoming gesture to encourage your puppy to come. When the puppy reaches you, praise and give a treat. Follow with a “sit”. Repeat the command (taking only five steps) several times gradually, then increase the distance to ten steps. Always praise when your puppy comes to you on command. Never call a puppy to scold or do anything they won’t like (such as giving medication or a bath). Responding to the “come” command should always be a positive experience for the puppy. Remember, food should only be used as a motivator to get a desired behavior. Food can be slowly replaced with praise, as you will need that special food motivator for advancing training.

Drop it. There are going to be many times that your puppy picks up something you don't want it to have. A drop it command is very useful in these situations. Start when the puppy has a toy he/she is not super interested in. Rattle a treat bag or show the puppy you have a treat. As soon as you have the puppy's attention it should drop what is in its mouth to eat the treat. While it is dropping the treat say “drop it” to pair the behaviour with the word you want to signify it. Continue to work on this behaviour with your puppy holding increasingly desired objects.

Back up. This is an incredibly useful behaviour if you have a dog that likes to be close to you. If you are walking towards your dog it is usually going to move out of the way. As you continue to move towards it, the dog should move backwards. You can then pair the behaviour with the word.

   - Crate Training

The crate, when used correctly, has many advantages for both you and your pet. With a pet that is crate trained, you can:
- Enjoy complete peace of mind when leaving your dog at home alone, knowing that nothing will be soiled or destroyed and that he is comfortable, protected, and not developing bad habits.
- Housebreak your dog more quickly by using the close confinement to encourage control, establish a regular routine for outdoor elimination, and to prevent accidents at night or when left alone.
- Effectively confine your dog at times when he may be underfoot (meals, family activities, guests, workmen, etc.), over-excited or bothered by too much confusion, too many children, or illness. Travel with your dog without risk of the driver being dangerously distracted or the dog getting loose and lost.

Your dog can:
- Enjoy the privacy and security of a “den” of his own, to which he can retreat when tired, stressed, or ill.
- Avoid much of the fear/confusion/punishment caused by your reaction to problem behavior.
- More easily learn to control his bowels and to associate elimination only with the outdoors or other designated location.
- Be spared the loneliness and frustration of having to be isolated (basement, garage, outside) from comfortable indoor surroundings when being restricted or left alone.
- Be conveniently included in family outings, visits, and trips, instead of being left behind at home. You want to enjoy your pet and be pleased with his behavior. Your dog wants little more from life than to please you. A dog crate can help to make your relationship what each of you wants and needs it to be.

Crate Size
The crate should always be large enough to permit the dog to stretch out flat on his side without being cramped and to sit up without hitting his head on top. It is always better to use a crate a little too large rather than one too small.

Crate Location
Since one of the main reasons for using a crate is to confine a dog without making him feel isolated or banished, it should be placed in, or as close to, a “people” area-kitchen, family room, etc. To provide even a greater sense of security and privacy, it should be put in a corner.

Crating a puppy
A young puppy (8-16 weeks) should normally have no problem accepting a crate as his/her own place. Any complaining at first is not caused by the crate, but by learning to accept the new controls on the environment. Actually, the crate will help puppy in adapting more easily and quickly to their new world. For bedding, use a towel or small blanket that can be easily washed. Also, you might include some freshly worn article of clothing such as a T-shirt. Avoid putting newspaper in or under the crate since its odor may encourage elimination.

Make it clear to all family members that the crate is not a playhouse. It is meant to be a “special” room for the puppy whose rights should be recognized and respected. You should however accustom the puppy from the start to letting you reach into the crate at any time, lest he become overprotective of it.

Establish a “crate routine” immediately, closing the puppy in it at regular intervals during the day (his own nap times can guide you) and whenever he must be left alone for up to 3-4 hours. Give him/her a chew toy for distraction and be sure to remove the collar and tags which could get caught in the crate.

The puppy should be shown no attention while in the crate. Any attention shown to the puppy will simply cause the puppy to believe that whining, crying, etc., is all that is needed to gain more attention.

The puppy should be taken outside last thing every night before being put into the crate. Immediately when the puppy is removed from the crate in the morning, he/she should be taken outside to the chosen area for eliminations. If your puppy wakes up through the night, you can very quietly and calmly take it outside to eliminate, then place it back in the crate for the rest of the night. Try to keep as many lights off as possible so the puppy doesn't think it's time to get up for the day.

Always feed the puppy early enough to allow ample time for eliminations after eating before placing in the crate. This can be up to one hour, depending on the dog. Simply clock the time after eating until the bowel movement occurs to determine the time interval for your puppy.

   - House Training Techniques

Housetraining is not only possible, it is also easy because of the natural instinct of dogs to relieve themselves away from their living quarters. The use of the pet crate makes the whole process go more smoothly. A pet crate has the additional advantage of protecting your home from the potential destructive behavior of a curious puppy, as well as minimizing the chances of the puppy injuring themselves.

Feed your puppy 3 meals per day. Consistency in feeding time makes the time of elimination more predictable. Make the last feeding no later than 6pm. Removing water at 8pm may be helpful for the first few months.

Select one toilet area for your puppy. Take your puppy to this area at the time he/she is most likely to need to eliminate right after sleeping, soon after eating, etc. In the beginning, it is advisable to take the puppy out every 30-45 minutes. Always provide the puppy the opportunity to go outside to eliminate just before being put back in the crate. Always take the puppy outside immediately after returning home before the excitement causes an accident. Praise your puppy immediately after eliminating in the right area. If you find an accident, do not raise your voice, do not spank your puppy, and do not rub their nose in it. Punishment does not make your puppy afraid of the accident, but afraid of you. It also makes your puppy think that you don't want the puppy to pee in front of you. This means that when you take your puppy outside it is going to hold it; as soon as you come back inside that puppy will then run somewhere that you can't see it and pee there.

Most puppies will be “regular”. They will go out at the same time every time after eating. Most puppies will eliminate within 10 minutes after eating. Once you have learned the specific time for your specific time for your specific puppy, you will have a good idea what time you should routinely take the puppy outside.

Use products that neutralize odor when cleaning up accidents. We stock an effect stain and odor removal particularly for this reason.

Remember to be patient. Housetraining should be complete by 4-6 months of age, but it is still advisable to keep the pet in the crate when you are away from home for several months to prevent possible destructive behaviors. Also, remember that your puppy needs plenty of play and exercise when out of the crate.

   - Calming Signals

Everyone wants to have a well mannered puppy that can easily be taken in public areas and is happy to have people come to the house. Many dogs can be nervous of new situations or people, and try to give us clues to let us know they are uncomfortable with the situation. It is important for us to recognize these clues and respond appropriately to our dogs so they will continue to trust us.

Dogs communicate with each other using a system of body language that we call calming signals. This body language tells other dogs not to be stressed out, and that this dog is trying to defuse a situation it feels uncomfortable with. Dogs will try using calming signals with us if we are doing something that makes them feel uncomfortable. Examples of calming signals are yawning, lip licking, and turning their head to the side. If these calming signals do not work, and the dog feels its efforts to communicate with us are not working, its next avenue of communication is to growl at us.

A dog that growls is not a bad dog. A growling dog is telling us that it is uncomfortable with the situation. If your dog growls, you need to back off for a moment and try to determine what is upsetting your dog before reacting. Please do not punish your dog for growling. By growling, your dog is trying to communicate with you that it is not happy with the situation. This may be someone too close to its face (dogs do not inherently like being hugged), or it may be guarding a resource. If you punish your dog for growling, the next time your dog is in an uncomfortable situation it may not growl since it has been taught not to, and will instead give you no warning until it progresses to its next mode of communication, which is snapping or snarling. If this gets punished then the next time your dog may bite without any warnings to you.

   - Mouthing / Chewing

Many puppies explore the world with their mouths, and chew/mouth on hands and feet. The best way to get through this stage is to either ignore your puppy when it is mouthing or to put something else in its mouth you want it to chew on and praise it for chewing on that. If you think of how puppies play with each other, they are constantly bashing each other around the face. If you tell your puppy no and push its face away from you it's just going to think that you are playing and get more wound up. It will think that chewing on your hands is a way to get attention. If you instead stand up and turn your back to the puppy (no eye contact either!) the puppy is going to learn that mouthing does not get it any attention at all and will stop.

Puppies do start losing their puppy teeth and getting their adult teeth in around 16 weeks old. At this time the mouthing progresses into a chewing/teething behaviour. Ensure you have lots of different chew toys around that you want your puppy to chew on while its mouth is sore and itchy.

CAT HEALTH

   - Spaying and Neutering

Feline spay or Ovariohysterectomy
Feline spay or Ovariohysterectomy is the surgical removal a female cat’s ovaries and uterus. It is generally performed at 6 months of age, but can done earlier or later in life. Your cat should have no food after midnight the day before surgery, but water is fine. Please drop off in the morning between 7:30am- 8:30am (this time is flexible) and pick up between 6-8pm the same day. Your pet will go home with pain control medication and discharge instructions which the staff will review at the time of pick up.

What are the Benefits of Spaying Your Cat?
- The reduction of hormone related behavior problems such as roaming, marking territory, feline behavior changes and aggression whilst in heat.
- The prevention of unwanted litters and risks associated with pregnancy such as Caesarian Sections
- The prevention of uterine, ovarian, and mammary gland (breast) cancers
- The prevention of pyometra, a life threatening infection in the uterus
- The prevention of annoying heat cycles

Feline neuter or Orchidectomy
Feline neuter or Orchidectomy, is the surgical removal of a male cat’s testicles. It is generally performed at 6 months of age, but can done later in life. A neuter is a day surgery. Please drop him off in the morning between 730am-830am (this time is flexible) and pick up is between 6pm-8pm the same day. Your pet will go home with pain medication and discharge instructions, which the staff will review at the time of pick up. (Click on discharge instructions)

What are the Benefits of Neutering Your Cat?
- Aids in the prevention of unwanted litters
- The prevention or reduction of testosterone mediated behavioral problems, such as inter cat aggression and fighting, marking territory, and roaming.
- The reduction of odor in cat urine.

   - Vaccinations

Keeping your pet vaccinated is an important part of preventative health care. Vaccines are an easy and effective way of protecting your pet from serious illness. Every pet even if they are kept indoors should be vaccinated. Here at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital we follow modern vaccination protocols and can tailor your pet’s vaccine requirements based on lifestyle and exposure risks.

Vaccines are broken down into “core” vaccines which are recommended for all puppies and kittens regardless of lifestyle and “non-core” vaccines which are tailored to your pet. We would be happy to discuss your individual needs for your pet.

Core vaccines for dogs are Distemper, Adenovirus, Para-influenza and Parvovirus, and Rabies. Non-core vaccines are, Bordetella, Lyme and Leptosporosis.

Core vaccines for cats are Feline Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies (if going outside). Non-core vaccines are Feline Leukemia Virus

How many vaccines does my pet need?
Kittens and puppies typically start with a series of three vaccines spaced one month apart in order to develop a proper immunity to the diseases we are vaccinating them for. These vaccines are then boostered one year after the last vaccine date, and then every 1 to 3 years depending on the vaccine.

Annual Physical Exams
A physical examination is performed with all vaccination appointments; if your pet is not currently due for vaccines we still recommend an annual check up exam. An annual exam and thorough history is one of the most important tools in our diagnostic toolbox. Even if your pet is healthy a physical exam will allow us to evaluate them for subtle changes and early detection is the key to successful outcomes and prolongs the length and quality of life for our pets.

Read more about Feline Vaccinations here.

   - Feline Behavior

Cats make wonderful pets! Understanding normal feline behavior and communication can make the cat-owner relationship strong and long lasting. It can also prevent undesirable behaviors and problems. The following website is filled with oodles of information on understanding normal behavior, feline learning, stress and aggression prevention, environmental enrichment and more. Its provided by the American Association of Feline Practitioners and is worth the read if you own or plan on owning a cat.

   - Parasite Control

To enjoy healthy and active lives, cats need the protection from internal and external parasites. Cats sleep in our beds and jump up on the kitchen table. Some parasites that cats can aquire can be inadvertently transmitted to humans. Children are especially at risk Eggs of parasites are incredible resistant to environmental changes and can remain dormant in the soil for several years before infecting your cat or a member of your family. We at Tantallon Veterinary Hospital will help you decide which parasite control program is best for your pet based on your cats lifestyle.

External parasites
The most commonly encountered external parasites are Fleas and Ticks. All cats that go outside are at risk of getting fleas and ticks and this is most prevalent when there is no frost on the ground. Fleas can make your cat itchy and uncomfortable but can also cause flea allergy dermatitis, anemia and can transmit tapeworm. Ticks are blood feeders with an almost worldwide distribution. They are icky, plus they are well equipped to transmit disease agents such as viruses, bacteria and protozoa. The most well known and most common of these is the bacteria that transmits Lyme disease.

Intestinal parasites
Intestinal worms in cats come in 3 forms: Roundworm, Hookworm and Tapeworm.

They are contracted by one of the following modes of transmission:
- The passage from a pregant or nursing mother to her kittens
- The ingestion of feces
- The ingestion of raw meat or animal remains in the environment
- The ingestion of infected soil
- The ingestion of unwashed/uncooked infected vegetables

Intestinal worms can cause no symptoms or can cause weight loss, malnourishment, intestinal discomfort, intestinal blockage, bloody diarrhea, and/ or anemia.

We have different treatment options available for prevention and treatment of parasites through topical, oral or injectable (flea) administration. These are prescriptions that are designed to be safer and more effective than ‘over the counter’ type products.

Please contact us for further information on what treatment is best for your pet.

   - The Litter Box

The litter box is where your cat will defecate and urinate. These are some guidelines you should follow in order to reduce odor and encourage your cat to use this box regularly.

1) It is strongly recommended that you purchase an ‘under the bed’ storage container to use for your litter box. This has several advantages. It does not have a cover, which cats prefer. It is large and roomy so cats can get in and dig around and ‘chose’ a spot to use. They are easy to get in and get out. It can be purchased at most department or hardware stores. Hint: You do not need to purchase the ‘cover’ for the box.

2) Change the litter frequently. No, this will not be your favourite job but it is a must! If using clumping cat litter scoop twice a day and dump, clean and replace with fresh cat litter twice a week. Yes that’s right twice a week, even if using clumping cat litter. If you are using ‘regular cat litter’ you need to scoop twice a day and dump every other day as opposed to twice weekly with the clumping. This is assuming you are using the’ under the bed’ storage container.

3) Be sure that the litter box is kept in a quiet, easily accessible, comfortable place. Don’t have it adjacent to the vacuum cleaner if your cat is terrified of the vacuum.

4) Use at least 2 inches deep cat litter.
If your cat is not using the litter box please call us as there are numerous possible causes, some medical, some behavioural. All can be treated!

   - Scratching

First of all let’s talk about why cats scratch. Cats ‘scratch’ on items for two reasons. The reason we think of most often is to sharpen their claws. But scratching also serves another purpose. When scratching on items such as furniture or scratching posts, cats are leaving scent from the sweat glands on the pads of their paws and between the pads. The scent left behind says, ‘I was here, and this is my territory’. Once their scent is on an object, they often return to the object and apply their scent again.

We can use this information to our advantage when trying to get a cat to use a scratching post. If we can get a cat’s scent on the post (put a little catnip on the post to get the cat to scratch), the cat will likely come back to the post to replenish his scent. Similarly, it is helpful to remove the cat’s scent from objects that cat has been scratching on but we wish he wasn’t.

What are my options?

Get a Scratching Post
Try different kinds of scratching posts. Some cats prefer real wood posts while others prefer cardboard, and still others, carpeted posts. Find out which kind your cat prefers and then spray with a catnip spray or keep a catnip toy nearby.

Finally, show your cat how to use the scratching post and praise or give your kitty special treats when they use their furniture instead of yours. Like most training, the earlier your start, the better. Remember though, kittens younger then six months generally do not respond to catnip as well as adults do. You may need to try other incentives.

The most important characteristics of a post are that it be taller than the cat when he stands on his hind legs, sturdy enough not to tip over and located in a prominent accessible area. The more scratched and awful looking, the more your cat will love it and use it instead of your furniture

Try Soft Paws
These are plastic shields that are glued onto your cat’s nails. They prevent them from scratching but they do require application and patience from your cat. Re- application is needed every 4-6 weeks. We provide the application service at our hospital.

Nail Trims
If your cat has clear nails (most do) you can see the pink or the ‘quick’. Avoid the pink area as this supplies blood to the nail and if trimmed it will bleed. If you prefer a veterinarian to trim your cats nails please book an appointment. Trimming the nails every 1-2 months should keep them short. Cats can still scratch but they will do ‘less damage’ to the furniture.


We are now open 7 days a week until 8PM!

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital is a full-service companion animal hospital that services dogs, cats, rabbits and pocket pets.

Our cat boarding facility is a climate-controlled area with large cages and kitty condos. Our boarding facility is kept clean and pets are well cared for by our attentive staff.

We will care for your pets as if they were our own!


Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Your Healthy, Happy Pet is Our Business

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Dr. Heather Mosher
  • Dr. William Hoskin
  • Dr. Emily Poynter
  • Dr. Kathryn Butler
  • Dr. Thalia Rashid
  • Dr Karen Johnson
  • Dr. Vanessa Gerber
  • David Allan
  • Bobbi Anne
  • Deidra
  • Maddie
  • Rebecca
  • Kaylyn
  • Sydney
  • Johnny
  • Kelsey
  • Nicole
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
  • Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital

Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
Tantallon Veterinary Hospital
5250 St. Margaret's Bay Road Upper Tantallon, Nova Scotia B3Z 2J1


Schedule:

Monday - Friday: 7:30am - 8:00pm
Saturday and Sunday 8:00am - 8:00pm
Closed on statutory holidays

After hours emergency please contact Metro Animal Emergency Hospital at 468-0674.
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